Short Communication

Primary ciliary dyskinesia in a Staffordshire bull terrier : clinical communication

M. De Scally, R.G. Lobetti, E. Van Wilpe
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association | Vol 75, No 3 | a471 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jsava.v75i3.471 | © 2004 M. De Scally, R.G. Lobetti, E. Van Wilpe | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 June 2004 | Published: 20 June 2004

About the author(s)

M. De Scally,
R.G. Lobetti,
E. Van Wilpe,

Full Text:

PDF (482KB)

Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a diverse group of inherited structural and functional abnormalities of the respiratory and other cilia, which results in recurrent respiratory tract infections. Primary ciliary dyskinesia was diagnosed in a 14-week old Staffordshire bull terrier that had a history of respiratory disease from 7 weeks of age. Pneumonia was diagnosed on thoracic radiographs and transtracheal aspirate. Transmission electron microscopy of the bronchi and trachea indicated the presence of both primary and secondary ciliary dyskinesia. The most prominent primary defects consisted of absent inner dyneim arms, absent radial spokes and absence of the central microtubules. These defects accounted for 62 % of the total number of cross-sections screened. Non-specific ciliary abnormalities encountered most often were compound cilia, swollen cilia, addition / deletion of peripheral doublets and disorganised axonemes (26 %). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of PCD described in the Staffordshire bull terrier and the first report of PCD in South Africa.

Keywords

Congenital; Electron Microscopy; Immotile Cilia; Pneumonia

Metrics

Total abstract views: 2429
Total article views: 5199

 

Crossref Citations

1. Clinical Findings and Prevalence of the Mutation Associated with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia in Old English Sheepdogs
A.-C. Merveille, G. Battaille, F. Billen, S. Deleuze, M. Fredholm, A. Thomas, C. Clercx, A.-S. Lequarré
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine  vol: 28  issue: 3  first page: 771  year: 2014  
doi: 10.1111/jvim.12336