Case Report

An outbreak of babesiosis in imported sable antelope (hippotragus niger)

Elizabeth F. McInnes, C. G. Stewart, B. L. Penzhorn, D. G.A. Meltzer
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association | Vol 62, No 1 | a1582 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jsava.v62i1.1582 | © 2020 Elizabeth F. McInnes, C. G. Stewart, B. L. Penzhorn, D. G.A. Meltzer | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 August 2017 | Published: 30 March 1991

About the author(s)

Elizabeth F. McInnes, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Medical University of Southern Africa, South Africa
C. G. Stewart, Department of Infectious Diseases and Public Health, South Africa
B. L. Penzhorn, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Medical University of Southern Africa, South Africa
D. G.A. Meltzer, Price Forbes Chair of Wildlife Diseases, University of Pretoria, South Africa

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Abstract

A complete necropsy performed on 2 sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), revealed lesions concomitant with a massive haemolytic crisis. These included widespread oedema and anaemia of the carcass, severe oedema of the lungs, petechiae and echymoses of the epicardium, a moderate splenomegaly and a severe haemoglobinuria. The histopathological lesions included a moderate alveolar oedema, the presence of haemosiderin in the spleen and lymph nodes, and mild degenerative changes of the renal tubular epithelium. Peripheral blood and brain smears contained numerous parasitised red blood cells. The parasites were round or oval in shape containing a single or double area of purple-staining chromatin along a portion of the margin of the organism. It was identified as Babesia irvinesmithi Martinaglia, 1936, which is unique to sable. Seven sable antelope were subsequently treated with imidocarb diproprionate at a dose of 1,2 mg kg-l. No adverse side-effects have been noted in these animals.

Keywords

Sable; Hippotragus niger; babesiosis; Babesia irvinesmithi

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